Young cancer survivor makes big donation to Kansas City’s Children’s Mercy Hospital

It was Christmas Monday at the Children’s Mercy Hospital thanks to a seven-year-old cancer patient with a big heart and a big donation. It’s not every day that a truckload of toys shows up at Children’s Mercy’s doorstep. But this is a truckload of thanks to Tripp Hughes, a cancer patient who just went through chemotherapy and is thankful to everyone there. “They would do anything to make us feel as at home as possible,” Tripp said. “So we just wanted them to feel the way they made us feel too.” Tripp and his mom started a toy ride and it just kept growing. They collected 4,400 toys, packed in more than 100 boxes. “We just wanted to make sure we got everything the hospital needed to be able to give back what they gave us,” Krista Hughes said. During the pandemic, patients are not allowed to share toys so they go home with the children. Stocks were low and this is typically a slow time for toy donations. “I love it. He’s just been going through a really hard time in his life and his thought was, ‘How can I give back and help other kids who are struggling? things?’ So I think that’s great,” said Gregg Rosenboom. Tripp said he couldn’t wait to make the donation and he also got a surprise – another chance to celebrate his latest cancer treatment by ringing a bell.

It was Christmas Monday at the Children’s Mercy Hospital thanks to a seven-year-old cancer patient with a big heart and a big donation.

It’s not every day that a truckload of toys for Children’s Mercy shows up. But this is a truckload of thank-you notes from Tripp Hughes, a cancer patient who just went through chemotherapy and is thankful to everyone there.

“They would do anything to make us feel as at home as possible,” Tripp said. “So we just wanted them to feel the way they made us feel too.”

Tripp and his mom started a toy campaign and it just kept growing. They collected 4,400 toys packed in more than 100 boxes.

“We just wanted to make sure we got everything the hospital needed to be able to give back what they gave us,” Krista Hughes said.

During the pandemic, patients are not allowed to share toys, so they go home with the children. Stocks were low and this is typically a slow time for toy donations.

“I love it. He just went through a really hard time in his life and his thought was, ‘How can I give back and help other kids who are going through hard things?’ So I think that’s great,” said Gregg Rosenboom.

Tripp said he couldn’t wait to make the donation and he also got a surprise – another chance to celebrate his latest cancer treatment by ringing a bell.

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