NC couple plans wedding in 2 weeks following cancer diagnosis

The pandemic put numerous weddings on hold, pushing many back to the summer of 2021. Carene and Cameron Hughes planned to reschedule their April 2020 wedding to August, until another health issue prompted them to cancel their wedding in a much shorter amount of time. plans, NBC affiliate WECT reports. Click on the video player above to view the headlines of WXII 12 News. Planning a wedding is stressful on its own, but Carene Hughes made one with two weeks notice. This all happened while the couple were preparing for a memorial service. “Most vows – you know, the tradition says ’till death do us part’ and I told her I don’t want that at our wedding at all, it’s not allowed at our wedding,” Carene told WECT. Her fiancé, Cameron Hughes, received a heartbreaking diagnosis in May. “I found out I have a tumor on the head of my pancreas, it’s about two centimeters. I also have two lesions on my liver, so it’s spread to my liver, so technically I’m in stage four,” Cameron Hughes said. Doctors advised them to postpone the wedding. The ceremony they had planned for late summer quickly took shape before Cameron’s first round of chemotherapy in July. The entire community contributed to make the couple’s wedding a reality. A colleague baked their cake, a friend conducted their ceremony, and someone on Facebook agreed to take photos. Strangers even donated decorations. “It was four to six months if we didn’t do anything, if we didn’t do any treatment. Then it was nine to 12 months on chemo, so that’s just not the time. It’s been less than a year so we just wanted to go ahead and do it now while we have time,” Carene told WECT with tears in her eyes. “I didn’t want to be the memories of our wedding rolling down the aisle in a wheelchair or something, I wanted it to be a memory that she could have, and that kids could have that even after I’m gone,” Cameron said. They exchanged their vows on Sunday, crashing barefoot in the sand at Fort Fisher in the distance. Surrounded by family and friends, they vowed to love each other through the best, worst, and whatever may come. “Don’t take life for granted. You know, I’m 51 and I’ve had a pretty good life. There are things I want to see that I may not get to see, so live life, be happy, love, one love,” Cameron said. The Hughes and their four children hope a clinical trial at Duke University can make a difference, but they take it day by day and make sure that the time they have together, however long, is well spent. Carene has set up a website for anyone who wants to support Cameron and follow his journey.

The pandemic has put countless weddings on hold and many pushed back to the summer of 2021.

Carene and Cameron Hughes had planned to reschedule their April 2020 wedding to August, until another health issue prompted them to plan their wedding in a much shorter time frame, reports NBC affiliate WECT.

Click on the video player above to view the headlines of WXII 12 News.

Planning a wedding is stressful on its own, but Carene Hughes made one with two weeks notice. This all happened while the couple were preparing for a memorial service.

“Most vows — you know, the tradition says ’till death do us part’ and I told her I don’t want that at our wedding at all, it’s not allowed at our wedding,” Carene told WECT.

Her fiancé, Cameron Hughes, received a heartbreaking diagnosis in May.

“I found out I have a tumor on the head of my pancreas, it’s about two centimeters. I also have two lesions on my liver, so it’s spread to my liver, so technically I’m in stage four,” said Cameron Hughes.

Doctors advised them to move the wedding forward. The ceremony they had planned for late summer quickly took shape before Cameron’s first round of chemotherapy in July.

The entire community contributed to make the couple’s wedding a reality. A colleague baked their cake, a friend conducted their ceremony, and someone on Facebook agreed to take photos. Strangers even donated decorations.

“It was four to six months if we didn’t do anything, if we didn’t do any treatment. Then it was nine to 12 months on chemo, so that’s just not the time. It’s been less than a year so we just wanted to go ahead and do it now while we have time,” Carene told WECT with tears in her eyes.

“I didn’t want the memories of our wedding of me rolling down the aisle in a wheelchair or anything. I wanted it to be a memory that she could have, and have kids even after I’m gone,” said Cameron.

They exchanged their vows on Sunday, barefoot in the sand at Fort Fisher as the waves crashed in the distance. Surrounded by family and friends, they vowed to love each other through the best, worst, and whatever may come.

“Don’t take life for granted. You know, I’m 51 and I’ve had a pretty good life. There are things I want to see that I may not get to see, so live life, be happy, love, one love,” Cameron said.

The Hughes and their four children hope a clinical trial at Duke University can make a difference, but they take it day by day and make sure that the time they have together, however long, is well spent.

Carene has set up a website for anyone who wants to support Cameron and follow his journey.

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