Dr Lawrence F. Eichenfield Describes the Differences Between Treating Adult vs Pediatric Patients With AD

Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) often vary in disease severity, and it can be difficult to assess how much of a topical therapy is needed, said Lawrence F. Eichenfield, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at Rady Children’s Hospital. -San Diego.

Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis often vary in disease severity, and it can be difficult to assess how much of a topical therapy is needed, according to Lawrence F. Eichenfield, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego and vice president and professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Translation

How does the treatment of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis differ from the treatment of adult patients?

Eichenfield: In each patient with atopic dermatitis, we assess the severity of the disease and also the course of the disease, its persistence. In pediatric atopic dermatitis, we have this huge variety, from young babies with disease that is easily controlled, using traditional mild topical corticosteroids and requiring only moisturizing creams, to more serious illnesses. But as we move on to the older children and teens, there are always issues as to what an appropriate amount of topical therapy is to control and control disease. It’s a lot of work, with different topical resources. We have both our steroids and non-steroids. We need to work with the families to understand what a safe amount of medication is to use and determine if we need anything other than topical medications to control the disease.

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