Dartmouth-Hitchcock roundtable addresses parent concerns over vaccinations for kids

Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock hosted a virtual talk about children, COVID-19 and vaccinations. Doctors have said New England is leading the way when it comes to getting injections for younger patients. The pediatric panel at the hospital said all vaccines are safe, Pfizer for anyone 12 years and older, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson for those who have turned 18. a first dose. Northern New England shows the way,” said Dr. Keith Loud, pediatrics chair. Council members immediately recommend the injection for people with chronic health conditions. They said that although it was rare, hundreds of children have died from COVID-19 “The majority of them had chronic conditions, including asthma, heart disease, neurological and developmental delays,” Loud said. “So I think it’s actually very, very, very important that children with underlying disease are at the head of the line. The pediatricians still recommend masks for children 2 years and older in public places where there is a risk of exposure for unvaccinated people. They suggest that families consider mask modeling. “Parents, although they may not need that mask.” to wear, may be vaccinated, modeling appropriate, timely masks for young children will be very important and to train their older siblings. ailments that can also be exposed,” said CHaD Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Ellie Maguire. “Get everyone involved because we know younger kids will follow.” The doctors said the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics prefer routine vaccines at the same time as the COVID-19 vaccine. at this point it’s much more efficient and creates a situation where people are more likely to get the right vaccines they need,” said ChaD Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Paul Palumbo. Trials are underway and by the end of the summer children 5 years and older may be eligible for the vaccine.

Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock hosted a virtual talk about children, COVID-19 and vaccinations. Doctors have said New England is leading the way when it comes to getting injections for younger patients.

The pediatric panel at the hospital said all vaccines are safe, Pfizer for anyone 12 years and older, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson for those who have turned 18.

“More than a third of teens in New Hampshire and more than half of teens in Vermont have already had their first dose. Northern New England is leading the way,” said Dr. Keith Loud, president of pediatrics.

Council members immediately recommend the injection for people with chronic health problems. They said that although it was rare, hundreds of children have died from COVID-19.

“The majority of them had chronic conditions, including asthma, heart disease, neurological and developmental delays,” Loud said. “So I think it’s actually very, very, very important that children with underlying disease are at the head of the line.”

The pediatricians still recommend masks for children 2 years and older in public places where there is a risk of exposure to unvaccinated people. They suggest that families consider mask modeling.

“Parents, while they may not have to wear that mask, may have been vaccinated. Modeling appropriate, timely masks for young children will be very important and to enable their older siblings who may also be exposed,” CHaD pediatric nurse Ellie Maguire said. “Get everyone involved because we know younger kids will follow.”

The doctors said the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics prefer routine vaccines at the same time as the COVID-19 vaccine.

“So we can give them together right now. It’s much more efficient and it creates a situation where people are more likely to get the right vaccines they need,” said ChaD Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Paul Palumbo.

Trials are underway and by the end of the summer, children ages 5 and older may be eligible for the vaccine.

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