Children’s Cancer Clinical Trials Unit now backed by government funding | The Advocate

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More pediatric cancer patients will be able to stay in Tasmania for treatment, after the state government announced $600,000 over three years to secure the future of the only state unit for cancer clinical trials. The Children’s Cancer Clinical Trials Unit was established approximately four years ago with over $300,000 funding from The Kids’ Cancer Project to ensure that Tasmanian children with aggressive cancers could access innovative treatments locally by participating in large-scale to investigate. Before the state government’s commitment, the unit was previously completely dependent on donations. Tim Blair, the founder of Tim Blair Run for Kids Foundation, said this was a big win for Tasmanian families. “It means that they (cancer patients) can stay in Tasmania and be supported by their networks and it means that families can stay together while fighting something some of us will never understand,” he said. “By doing clinical trials it means better treatment and hopefully we’re getting closer to a cure. It’s absolutely huge for treating childhood cancer in Tasmania.” Mr Blair said the government funding provided assurances that the unit “was here” to stay”. The clinical trials department ran on the smell of an oily cloth,” he said. “It was limited to the treatments that could be given, but with the government funding, it’s here to stay.” Since the start of the unit, Tasmanian children have access to new therapeutic options for Hodgkin’s lymphoma, brain cancer and refractory solid tumors by participating in clinical trials. Several new clinical trials will be opened in the next six months, including a large-scale study on leukemia. The unit also continues to work to empower patients from the North and Northwest to better access examinations by providing outreach services to North-West Regional Hospital and Launceston General Hospital. a $300,000 pledge over the next three years from The Kids’ Cancer Project. Our journalists work hard to provide local, current news to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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September 5, 2021 – 4.30 pm

More pediatric cancer patients will be able to stay in Tasmania for treatment, after the state government announced $600,000 over three years to secure the future of the only state unit for cancer clinical trials.

The Children’s Cancer Clinical Trials Unit was established approximately four years ago with over $300,000 funding from The Kids’ Cancer Project to ensure that Tasmanian children with aggressive cancers could access innovative treatments locally by participating in large-scale to investigate.

Before the state government’s commitment, the unit was previously completely dependent on donations.

Tim Blair, the founder of Tim Blair Run for Kids Foundation, said this was a big win for Tasmanian families.

“It means that they (cancer patients) can stay in Tasmania and be supported by their networks and it means that families can stay together while fighting something some of us will never understand,” he said.

“Doing clinical trials means better treatment and hopefully we are closer to a cure.

“It’s absolutely huge for childhood cancer treatment in Tasmania.”

Mr Blair said the government funding provided assurances that the unit was “here to stay”.

“The clinical trials department ran on the smell of an oily cloth,” he said.

“It was limited to what treatments could be given, but with the government funding, it’s here to stay.”

Since the start of the unit, Tasmanian children have gained access to new therapeutic options for Hodgkin lymphoma, brain cancer and refractory solid tumors by participating in clinical trials.

Several new clinical trials will be opened in the next six months, including a large-scale study on leukemia.

The unit also continues to work to improve patient access to trials from the North and Northwest by providing outreach services to North-West Regional Hospital and Launceston General Hospital.

The government funding will be complemented by an additional $300,000 pledge over the next three years from The Kids’ Cancer Project.

Our journalists work hard to provide local, current news to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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